Yad Vashem

    “Yad Vashem” is a term that means "a place and a name" which refers to remembering the millions of Jews who were denied a proper burial. This web page is a memorial to the victims, survivors, and descendants of the holocaust; for it is by remembering the past, being mindful of the present, we may preserve the future.


The image of a remnant of cloth hanging from barbed wire portrays the holocaust.

Yad Vashem

 A remnant of cloth clinging to the barbed wire reveals

the story of those who survived and those who escaped.

Memorial

Shoes by the Danube

  

Shoes by the Danube is a memorial conceived and created by film director Can Togay and sculptor Gyula Pauer. The memorial honors the Jews who were executed by fascist Arrow Cross militiamen in Budapest during World War II. After being ordered to take off their shoes, the Jews were shot by the river's edge, so that their bodies fell into the flowing waters of the Danube and were carried away. Sixty pairs of cast iron shoes are mounted on the banks of the river.   


Photo art by Spadecaller.

The Wall

A painting created as a memorial for the victims and the survivors of the Krakow wall.

Beyond the Walls of Krakow

German authorities created the Jewish ghetto in Krakow on March 3, 1941 as a compulsory dwelling place for the city's Jews. 

Under the Nazi occupation the ghetto in Krakow was sealed off with a high wall erected around it. Ghetto dwellers without identity cards 

were rounded-up on May 30, 1942 in the square where roughly 4,500 of them were taken to Belzec death camp to perish. 

On October 28, 1942 'excessive' ghetto residents as the sick, the old, the handicapped, and little children became the target. 

Some 600 were murdered outright. The Schindler Jews were among the small number of survivors. 

'Beyond the Walls of Krakow' is a Spadecaller digital painting.  

Leonard Cohen - Dance Me to the End of Love

"Beside the crematoria, in certain of the death camps, a string quartet was pressed into performance while this horror was going on, those were the people whose fate was this horror also. And they would be playing classical music while their fellow prisoners were being killed and burnt". – Leonard Cohen

This video features the artwork of Spadecaller.